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Dementia and continence care: we need to question ‘pad culture’

Continence care routines in hospitals symbolise dementia care generally, but an approach that aims to maintain people’s independence and dignity is needed

Continence care routines in hospitals symbolise dementia care generally, but an approach that aims to maintain people’s independence and dignity is needed

A new in-depth study on the taboo subject of continence care suggests we need to deliver more humane care for the increasing number of people living with dementia who are admitted to acute hospitals.

I was pleased to be involved as part of the project team in this research, published by the University of West London’s Geller Institute of Ageing and Memory, which identified the ingrained practices of ‘pad culture’ in acute hospital settings.

Every nurse knows that the provision of personal care, including continence care, is one of the most important features of our role. As pressure on acute

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