News

Republic of Ireland nurses to vote on strike action over pay

The Irish and Midwives Organisation will begin balloting members from 1 September for ‘potential industrial action’ over the 5% public sector pay offer

The Irish and Midwives Organisation will begin balloting members from 1 September for ‘potential industrial action’ over the 5% public sector pay offer

Nurses in the Republic of Ireland will join colleagues in the UK in considering industrial action over pay, as the Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation (INMO) confirmed it will ballot its members next month.

The

The Irish and Midwives Organisation will begin balloting members from 1 September for ‘potential industrial action’ over the 5% public sector pay offer

Nurses in Ireland went on strike for the first time in 20 years in 2019
Nurses in Ireland went on strike for the first time in 20 years in 2019 – seen here picketing outside Cork University Hospital in Cork City in February 2019. Picture: David Creedon/Alamy Live News

Nurses in the Republic of Ireland will join colleagues in the UK in considering industrial action over pay, as the Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation (INMO) confirmed it will ballot its members next month.

The trade union, which represents more than 40,000 nurses and midwives in Ireland, said it will begin balloting from 1 September for ‘potential industrial action’ over the 5% public sector pay offer.

Nurse strike ballot will commence as planned unless the government makes a ‘meaningful offer’

First, the executive council of the INMO said it will commence a week-long pre-ballot information campaign starting today, to inform members of the process and issues.

It added that with the spiralling cost of living, the ballot would commence as planned, unless the government made a ‘meaningful offer in the meantime’ to public sector workers.

INMO general secretary Phil Ní Sheaghdha said: ‘The decision to ballot nurses and midwives is not one that is taken lightly, but the refusal of government as the employer to act on spiralling cost of living has left us with very little choice.

Nurses in Ireland last went on strike in 2019 for the first time in 20 years over low pay

‘Talks have been suspended since 17 June while inflation has reached a high of 9.1%, fuel continues to remain extremely expensive, rents continue to rise and childcare costs equal that of a second mortgage. Nurses and midwives do not get to opt out of these costs or find ways to cut corners as working from home is not an option.’

Nurses in Ireland went on strike in 2019 for the first time in 20 years over low pay and safe staffing.

The IMNO say the treatment of nurses ‘is not acceptable’ and that without a fair pay deal it is possible that strike action could be on the table once again.

In England, Wales and Scotland nurses are set to take part in a statutory ballot on industrial action next month. If members support strike action, as urged by the RCN, it will be the first-ever strike by RCN members in England, Wales or Scotland. RCN members went on strike for the first time in Northern Ireland in 2019. 

Nurses in Scotland recently voted to reject the Scottish Government’s pay offer of 5%. In England and Wales, the government has offered a 4% pay rise, branded a ‘national disgrace’ by the RCN.

In Northern Ireland a formal pay announcement has yet to be made.


In other news

Sign up to continue reading for FREE

OR

Unlock full access to RCNi Plus today

Save over 50% on your first three months:

  • Customisable clinical dashboard featuring 200+ topics
  • Unlimited online access to all 10 RCNi Journals including Nursing Children and Young People
  • RCNi Learning featuring 180+ RCN accredited learning modules
  • NMC-compliant RCNi Portfolio to build evidence for revalidation
  • Personalised newsletters tailored to your interests

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs